Land

Land Management

Understanding, Managing and Protecting our Resources

Natural Resource Assessment, Exploration and Protection

To successfully manage, develop and steward its lands, BBNC must first understand the resources and values they hold. We accordingly look to partner with resource companies, educational institutions and non-profit organizations to study our ANCSA lands and assess their resource, development and conservation potential. It is our goal to know as much as possible about the lands and resources entrusted to our management and stewardship so we can make informed decisions about their use and preservation.

Sand, Gravel, and Rock Material Sites

Traditionally, contractors seeking sand, gravel, or rock for projects in Bristol Bay had limited options, with materials often coming from Unalaska or Nome. Sourcing materials outside the region added time and expense to projects. BBNC supports efforts to identify and develop new local material sources. Working with village corporations and municipal governments, BBNC’s goal is to foster best management, maximize availability of material for infrastructure projects and to earn revenue. For example, BBNC recently partnered with Choggiung Limited to redevelop the Snake Lake Quarry outside of Dillingham, providing an additional local source of high-quality rock to western Bristol Bay. Additionally, Bristol Bay communities can request annual donations of up to 1,000 cubic yards of sand, gravel or rock for infrastructure and community projects.

BBNC’s Stand on the Proposed Pebble Mine

BBNC opposes the proposed Pebble mine project as well as offshore oil and gas leasing in the North Aleutian Basin. Our position is grounded in our Land & Resource Policies and informed by the careful research of potential impacts and thoughtful discussion of BBNC’s Board of Directors. In a shift from BBNC’s proactively neutral stance of 2006, BBNC’s opposition reflects the board’s determination that the proposed Pebble mine could have unquantifiable impacts on the natural resources of the Bristol Bay region.

Acting as an effective advocate for our shareholders, BBNC remains engaged in the proposed Pebble mine project permitting process. It’s another way for us to live out our corporation’s mission and values—and continue to pursue responsible development opportunities for the land that nurtures us.

Alaska Native Land Allotments

The Native Allotment Act of 1906 authorized the federal government to patent to 160 acres of land to Alaska Natives who could prove occupancy or subsistence use of selected sites. The Bureau or Land Management (BLM) has approved some 1,933 Native Allotments (representing 145,678 acres) in the Bristol Bay region. Most are held in Indian land trusts, with the government holding legal title to the land and allottees receiving beneficial use of the land. Allottees also have the right to sell allotments, in whole or in part (parcels).

BBNC seeks to enhance the value of its lands, which includes acquiring select Native Allotments for preservation, development or for augmenting adjacent land holdings. The BBNC Land Department continuously evaluates Native Allotments to assess their resource, economic development, subsistence, cultural and historical potential and to identify potential acquisitions. Let the BBNC Land Department know if you are interested in selling your Native Allotment.  (907) 278-3602 or (800) 426-3602

The Land Department has also prepared this Native Allotment Fact Sheet to learn more about managing your land, including ways you may be able to generate income from your allotment.

Alaska Native Land Allotments for Veterans

The 1906 Native Allotment program ended in 1971 with the passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA). However, some Alaska Natives were serving in the Armed Forces at the time and missed the deadline to apply for a Native Allotment. The John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, passed in March 2019, extends the opportunity for an estimated 2,800 Alaska Native veterans to apply for allotments between 2.5 and 160 acres.

Criteria:

  • Alaska Native
  • Served in Armed Forces between August 5, 1964 and December 31, 1971
  • Has not already received an allotment of land

Eligible veterans (or their heirs) will have five years to submit an application for an allotment. For more details, see our Native Allotments for Veterans Fact Sheet or visit www.blm.gov/ak-native-vietnam-vet-land-allotment-2019.

Read more details about BBNC’s position on Pebble mine and its comments on permitting documents.

Get information and updates on development of the mine at Pebble Watch.